Author Archive

The Big Reveal

Saturday, July 19th, 2014

Welcome to the Big Reveal
 

I enjoy reading author interviews, but often times they don’t ask the kinds
of questions I wonder about. So I’ve assembled a group of writers at
all levels, from un-agented to published, and every week I will
have a new question for them.
 

Do you prefer writing or editing?

 

Shelly Brown
Writing. I’m still trying to like editing.

 
Crystal Collier
Yes? Until about a year ago I really preferred editing, but this magic moment smacked me over the head and suddenly I understood the love of first drafts—probably because I adopted an in-depth outline and cut out much of the guess work. But editing? I could do that all day, every day.

 

Jessica Sayler
I prefer writing because I can let my imagination go crazy. I don’t have to worry so much about all the technical stuff, I can just have fun with my story.

 
Madeline Mora-Summonte
I don’t have a preference – I like them both for different reasons. Writing is wild and limitless, pure imagination and crazy creativity. Editing is taking all of that and taming it, pruning it, so it takes a shape that can be easily understood/read.

 

Rebecca Barrow
Editing. Drafting is really difficult for me—it takes me so much time and I have to force myself to spend the time doing it when I don’t want to. Editing is when I can finds ways to make the words say what I actually want them to, and seeing a story go from that first draft to a more polished product is always a great feeling.

 
Chad Morris
Writing. I love the creation of it. I don’t mind the initial rounds of editing because I can feel my work getting crisper, stronger, better. But after that, it gets harder and harder to go through my manuscripts.

Do you like writing or editing better?
 

Sidelined

Sunday, July 13th, 2014

I’ve got Kyra Lennon here today to talk about series writing. She is releasing the third book in her Game On Series and you must check them out.
 
Welcome, Kyra and congratulations on your newest release. So I was wondering. Did you start writing the first, Game On, knowing it’d be a series?

 
Nope, it was supposed to be one book, one story, but it got a little out of hand! One of my CPs suggested making it into a series shortly after the book was released, and early reviews told me that people were interested in the secondary characters as well as the main characters so I went with it – and here we are at Book 3!
 
Are there any more planned?
 
It will be a five book series. After that, no more lol!
 
You have your novella, but have you written any other stand alone stories/novels?
 
I have one standalone written, about a rock band, although there is potential for a companion novel. I also have two standalones half written, but I’m not really sure how they’re going to work out just yet. I will definitely be easing off on writing anymore book series for a while once Game On is finished!
 
How did you pick which characters to do the stories about?
 
Originally, the plan was for a four book series, focusing on Leah Walker (the MC from Game On) and her two best friends, Bree and Freya, with the final book going back to Leah. But Jesse Shaw was such a popular character in Game On, I decided it was worth giving him his own book. I have also had some suggestions that there should be a book dedicated to the Westberg Warriors beefcake, Bryce Warren, but I think adding any more books to the mix at this point would be a mistake.
 
Bryce gets a lot of page time in the last two books, so I think people will be satisfied.

 
Since your series has different main characters, how to do you keep track of all their personality traits and such. Are you organized with it all in a notebook(s)? Or on the computer?

 
Haha, I am not organised at all! I think I do have anotebook around somewhere that has very, very basic notes in, but for the most part, the information lives inside my head, and just stays there until I’m ready to let it out!

 
Thanks so much for interviewing me, Suzi! This was fun!

 
Thanks for sharing with us, Kyra.
 

At the age of twenty-one, Bree Collinson has more than she ever dreamed of. A handsome husband, a fancy house, and more shoes than Carrie Bradshaw and Imelda Marcos combined. But having everything handed to her isn’t the way Bree wants to live the rest of her life.

When an idea to better herself pops into her head, she doesn’t expect her husband to question her, and keep her tied by her apron strings to the kitchen.

Isolated and unsure who to turn to, Bree finds herself falling back into a dangerous friendship, and developing feelings for the only person who really listens to her. Torn between her loyalty to her husband and her attraction to a man who has the perfect family she always wanted, she has some tough choices to make.

While Bree tries to figure out what she wants, a tragedy rocks the Westberg Warriors, triggering some dark memories, and pushing her to take a look at what’s really important.

About the Author:

Kyra is a self-confessed book-a-holic, and has been since she first learned to read. When she’s not reading, you’ll usually find her hanging out in coffee shops with her trusty laptop and/or her friends, or girling it up at the nearest shopping mall.

Kyra grew up on the South Coast of England and refuses to move away from the seaside which provides massive inspiration for her novels.
Her debut novel, Game On (New Adult Contemporary Romance), was released in July 2012, and she scored her first Amazon Top 20 listing with her New Adult novella, If I Let You Go.

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The Big Reveal

Thursday, July 10th, 2014

Welcome to the Big Reveal
 

I enjoy reading author interviews, but often times they don’t ask the kinds
of questions I wonder about. So I’ve assembled a group of writers at
all levels, from un-agented to published, and every week I will
have a new question for them.
 

Do you prefer writing with real or imaginary settings?

 

 
Chad Morris
I like the imaginary stuff. Two of my recent reads had very intriguing settings: Coraline by Neil Gaiman, and I broke out of my genre and read Steelheart, by Brandon Sanderson. Of course, I pretty much love Cragbridge Hall. I usually only prefer real settings, when the story is true.

 

Shelly Brown
I’m a little bit obsessed with fictional settings in my writing. As a child I struggled with contemporary novels and that probably sways my feelings. Except for Nancy Drew. I could read those all day long. Nowadays I can read either just fine.
As far as a book with a fabulous setting there’s always Harry Potter. Setting was a HUGE character in those books. From bright fragrant candy shops to dank, snake-infested basements. From velvet-draped castle dorm rooms to the wind-whipped Quittich field. I could go on and on but it is clear that J.K. Rowling went through some trouble to make her locations memorable.

 
Crystal Collier
I love ANYTHING that takes me away. A time period, a foreign country, a new culture? I’m a sucker—as long as it doesn’t make me cry. I mostly read YA to stay up with my genre, branching occasionally into romance and thriller.

 

Jessica Sayler
I like to write both. With imaginary you can make up anything you want and anything goes, but with real you already know what’s there so that can be nice too. I also like to read both. Kelley Lynn’s Fraction series has beautiful imagery. It’s fantasy so the world she builds is fabulous and she does an amazing job of putting you right there with the characters.

 
Madeline Mora-Summonte
Most of my work takes place in “the real world” but I usually create the setting – making up the name of the town, etc. In my reading, I love when the setting is so strong it becomes a character in its own right, but I also enjoy when the setting is so recognizable that it fades into the background and I can focus on the story itself.

 

Rebecca Barrow
I would say that I do a mix of the two—I write contemporary, so my stories are set in the real world, but I often make up the actual towns or cities that I set them in. I find it easier that way, because no-one will be able to tell me that I got a specific detail of somewhere wrong. I mostly read contemp so I’m usually reading real settings, but a really good fantasy world will draw me in too. One of my absolute favourite worlds is Lyra’s Oxford in NORTHERN LIGHTS (and all the other worlds that appear in the rest of the series, too).

Do you prefer writing with real or imaginary settings?
 

The Lucky Seven

Sunday, July 6th, 2014

Thank you to Rachel Schieffelbein for tagging me for the Lucky Seven. What you do is turn to page 7 or 77 of your current work in progress, count down to the 7th line, and print the next 7 lines.
 
The WIP I’m revising right now is called Varying Degrees of Blame. A contemporary young adult in dual POV. It’s about two foster kids, an unrelated boy and girl who are thrown together in the same foster family.
 
The part you’re seeing is 16 year-old Kylie, right after Kylie witnesses her mother getting beaten by her boyfriend.
 

“You okay?” I asked, crouching down in front of her. Most people thought we were sisters because she was so young, and I hated explaining the truth.


“Kylie honey,” she croaked, “can you get me a glass of ice water please?”


“Sure.” I grabbed the water pitcher and an ice tray from the harvest gold fridge.


Mom held the sweating glass to a dark bump. “Do you want an ice pack?” I asked. She shook her head and removed the glass from her forehead. I reached over to touch the ugly bruise, and she shrunk back. “Maybe I can drive you to the hospital.”

 
This story is finished, but right now I’m using my fantastic CPs’ critiques to make it even better. And hopefully I’ll be able to start querying by fall sometime.
 
Thanks, Rachel. And go here to see her posting from her contemporary young adult, Girl In Trouble.

Looking back

Sunday, June 29th, 2014

 
So I’ve been working on revisions for my current WIP, Varying Degrees of Blame, a young adult contemporary novel. I have a notebook for each story I write where I keep notes and ideas. I’m not a big plotter, but I do a little of it. Or character sketches. Or whatever.
 
On the first page of the notebook for my current story are two names. Zander and Kylie. Originally, Zander had been my boy mc, and some of my beginning notes use that name. I don’t remember why, but I ended up using Christian instead. And now when I look back, I’m like, Zander—that is so totally not right. It doesn’t seem to fit him at all.
 
Which is funny because I can’t really tell you what Zander looks like. It’s just not the boy in my story.
 
Most of the time, once I’ve chosen a name for my mc, I stick with it. Secondary characters names may change, but rarely a main one. And I wish I could remember why I changed Zander’s name to Christian.
 
But now I’m curious if others do this. Have you ever gone back into your old notes and seen where you’ve changed the name of your mc, and does that original name just seem foreign now? So much that you wonder what you were thinking almost using that name?
 
Or is it just me?

The Big Reveal

Thursday, June 26th, 2014

Welcome to the Big Reveal

I enjoy reading author interviews, but often times they don’t ask the kinds
of questions I wonder about. So I’ve assembled a group of writers at
all levels, from un-agented to published, and every week I will
have a new question for them.

 

Is writing your real job?

 

Rebecca Barrow
Sadly, writing is not my real job. I work as a library assistant, so at least I’m still surrounded by books all day! I’ve been writing seriously for six years now. I wrote little stories when I was younger and the beginnings of about a thousand novels that I was sure were the best ideas in the entire UNIVERSE when I was 12 or 13. Thank God they are nowhere to be found now.

Chad Morris
I still have a full-time job writing curriculum for high schoolers. So, I write a lot. I didn’t write much as a kid. I was more of a doodler. But I didn’t like to read much either. I was a bit of a crazyhead.

 

Shelly Brown
I’m a mother of five. That’s my real job. The hours totally suck but I hear the payout is pretty awesome.

I had a few experiences early on in life from which I garnered that I was bad at fiction writing. It’s amazing how easy it is to crush a young spirit. I was a decent actress though and told stories that way for many years. I only picked up fiction writing again four years ago.

I didn’t write a lot as a kid BUT I did win honorable mention in elementary school for a Young Authors historical fiction piece about two friends who were separated during the Japanese Internment Camps. I bet the judges didn’t see that coming. ;)

Crystal Collier
YES! I even get paid. *gasp* I also home school my 3 wonderful children, serve as President over a church group of 75 children (teaching, coordinating weekly activities, managing other teachers and various lesson schedules/programs), and take the odd music composition/arrangement job or vocal performance gig.

 

Jessica Sayler
I’m a pediatric operating room nurse in my real life. I’ve been writing seriously for about three years. I did write a little as a kid, but never did anything seriously.

Madeline Mora-Summonte
I’ve been writing since I was a kid. It’s my passion, and I consider it a large part of who I am as a person.

 

Is writing your ‘real’ job?

Disappearing bloggers

Sunday, June 22nd, 2014

I’ve noticed lately how so many bloggers I know are slowing down. I get it because I know why—they’re becoming published and now deadlines are not always just their own and their time is less. Also, many of them are finding that Twitter and Facebook are easier ways to interact with friends and readers compared to blogging.

Image courtesy of Artur84
FreeDigitalPhotos.net


Other people just drop out of the blogging atmosphere, and I don’t have them on Twitter or Facebook, so I don’t know what’s happened. If they’ve stopped writing. Or if it was just the blogging they quit. But there’s no way of knowing.
 
And I miss hearing from some of those people.
 
Recently I went through Feedly to clean things up a bit. Take off blogs I don’t ever read, and remove some of those who haven’t posted in forever. Usually I won’t remove anything until there’s been like 6-8 months of silence. But I’ll also leave those people who I really hope to hear back from. To know if they’re still writing. Still pursing that dream. And maybe they will come back some day.
 
It makes me wonder also, if blogging by writers, in general, is slowing down, for reasons I mentioned above, or if it’s just the writers I know and follow.
 
What are your observations? Do you have bloggers you followed that dissappeared, and you wish they’d come back?

The Big Reveal

Thursday, June 19th, 2014

Welcome to the Big Reveal
 

I enjoy reading author interviews, but often times they don’t ask the kinds
of questions I wonder about. So I’ve assembled a group of writers at
all levels, from un-agented to published, and every week I will
have a new question for them.
 

Did you choose your genre or did your genre choose you?

 

Madeline Mora-Summonte
I write whatever story wants to be told. Sometimes it’s more contemporary or women’s fiction and sometimes it’s darker stuff, like horror. I read across genres, and I believe that influences what and how I write – in a good way.

 

Rebecca Barrow
I’d definitely say my genre chose me—I’ve never written anything but contemporary (adult at first, and now YA) and I just went in that direction naturally. YA contemporary is my favourite genre to read, too. I would love to try writing other genres that aren’t too far from contemp but are still different—magical realism and horror

 
Chad Morris
I love middle grade fiction. It’s where my imagination lives. Plus, four out of my five kids are in my target audience and I love to read my crazy stories to them. As they grow older I might explore YA a bit more. I read a lot of middle grade, some YA, and I like a good biography every now and then.

 

Shelly Brown
I write MG because I love MG. My only disappointment is that I love a good romantic subplot and those aren’t so big in MG. SOoOooOo, I secretly write YA and NA to get the love stories out of my system in hopes of not making any 6th graders gag. I read a lot of Middle Grade and I’m a sucker for classic lit.

 
Crystal Collier
I’ve been seriously writing since I was 10 and have tried Fantasy, Romance, Paranormal, Historical, Sci-fi, Mystery, Biographical, Horror, Action, Urban Fantasy, Contemporary, Thriller, Inspirational, and Comedy in everything from picture books to adult. I’ve found I’m happiest writing for young adults (Because let’s face it, they rock!), and MUST include fantastic elements. My current projects fall into Historical Paranormal, Fantasy Action, Urban Fantasy, and Sci-fi with strong elements of romance.

 

Jessica Sayler
It definitely chose me. I loved to read adult romance, so that’s what I thought I’d end up writing, but then my first book I wrote ended up being YA and I was so surprised. Then all my ideas were YA. I do have a few NA and Adult, but those are on hold for now.

 

What genres do you write and read?
 

Fathers

Sunday, June 15th, 2014

Happy Father’s Day to all the dad’s out there. Including my own and my husband–both terrific dads.
 
Most of the stories I write are young adult contemporary, and very often the fathers have a big part in the story.
 
More often, they tend to be absent, which of course affects my mc’s life in a big way, but sometimes the dad is a positive role model.

Image courtesy of digitalart / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The funny thing is with the ‘good’ dads, they don’t show up a lot throughout the story.
 
I have one father that I love. A story about two teens, a dual pov between a boy and a girl, called Beyond the Wake. The boy’s father is abusive, and you hardly see him. But the girl’s father is involved with his kids’ life.
 
And even though he works a lot and isn’t present for much of the story, when he’s around, he has a positive effect. And he plays a huge role in the growth of the boy–who has some issues to work through.
 
As much as I like to have bad parents that help propel my story forward, I like seeing those good parents too.
 
Do fathers play a big role in the stories you write?

The Big Reveal

Saturday, June 14th, 2014

Welcome to the Big Reveal
 

I enjoy reading author interviews, but often times they don’t ask the kinds
of questions I wonder about. So I’ve assembled a group of writers at
all levels, from un-agented to published, and every week I will
have a new question for them.
 

What word(s) or phrases show up way too often in your work?

 

Jessica Sayler
That was a big one in the beginning, but now I catch it as I write it and think, “do I need this?” Feel was a big one too, but I try to stay diligent on that one too. I think the normal ones like just and I think I use smile too much.

 
Madeline Mora-Summonte
Early drafts of my novels see a lot of looks/looking and turns/turning. “Purple prose” is also a problem in the beginning but I’m usually – hopefully! – able to weed that out as I revise and edit.

 

Rebecca Barrow
Just, really, actually, I mean, it’s like, whatever—I don’t realize how bad it is until I’m doing this and see each of them five times on every single page. My characters are also always sighing, shrugging, and rolling their eyes…

 
Chad Morris
Ninja, jedi, one-eyed eskimo midget.

 

Shelly Brown
I have a list saved for reference. My key offender is just. It’s just so handy! ;)

 
Crystal Collier
Eyes. I’m all about the eyes—windows to the soul. I also tend to favor “light” or “darkness” and really big or obscure words. They don’t seem odd to me because I use them all the time. *shrugs* (Apparently vacillate and putrescence fit into that category.)

 

What words show up in your work a lot?