Posts Tagged ‘The Big Reveal’

The Big Reveal

Thursday, August 21st, 2014

Welcome to the Big Reveal

I enjoy reading author interviews, but often times they don’t ask the kinds
of questions I wonder about. So I’ve assembled a group of writers at
all levels, from un-agented to published, and every week I will
have a new question for them.

What social media do you use?

 

Jessica Salyer
I have a blog and don’t use it much anymore, Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Goodreads, and a website. I probably spend the most time on Facebook. I try to stay away from Pinterest because I get sucked in and never come out. Lol.

Madeline Mora-Summonte
I have a blog, and I’m on Goodreads. But I probably use GR way more as a reader than as a writer. :)

 

Rebecca Barrow
I have a blog, which is becoming more and more neglected. I like Twitter but it can feel like I’m always trying to catch up on conversations or that my voice is just another one in millions. I have Goodreads but I don’t really use it properly—I think I have six friends? I just use it to keep track of books I don’t want to forget about, really. Pinterest is just for fun and less for writing purposes. And then I have my tumblr…tumblr is my jam. That’s where it’s all at. I LOVE IT. It can feel like a complete waste of time but in the best possible way. I like how one minute there’s an article about feminism or a beautiful poem and then there’s a cute cat gif. It’s the best.

Chad Morris
I use it all, but my favorites are facebook (https://www.facebook.com/chad.morris.5?ref=tn_tnmn) and twitter (@chadcmorris).

 

Shelly Brown
Social media is a weakness so I limit my usage. (Read between the lines: I talk to much) You can find me here:
FB: Shelly Brown
Twitter: @sbrownwriter
Google+: Shelly Brown

Crystal Collier
Goodreads, Facebook, Twitter, blog, pinterest, tumblr, Wattpad, and a few others. I try to be active in all of them, but I really lean toward Facebook, Twitter, and blogging. I keep track of my reading through Goodreads and enter the occasional giveaway. The rest of these platforms get a cursory glance from time to time.
What social media do you use?

The Big Reveal

Thursday, August 14th, 2014

Welcome to the Big Reveal
 

I enjoy reading author interviews, but often times they don’t ask the kinds
of questions I wonder about. So I’ve assembled a group of writers at
all levels, from un-agented to published, and every week I will
have a new question for them.
 

What’s your process for naming characters?

 

 
Madeline Mora-Summonte
Sometimes the perfect name just strikes me – love when that happens! – and it stays with the character throughout the whole writing process. Other times, I go with a name that feels right at the time, realizing it could change later. I sort of “collect” names. When I come across a name – a person’s name, a street name, etc – I jot it down, keep it for future reference.

 

Rebecca Barrow
I usually pick names randomly—sometimes depending on the personality of a character. If they’re going to be confident and loud, they might have something unusual, but if they are a quieter, shy character, it could be something sweet and short. I use baby name sites and nymbler.com to find names.

 
Chad Morris
It’s all about what feels right for the story. Some names I make up (Ms. Entrese, Mr. and Mrs. Trinhouse), others have been names I’ve heard before and thought “that would be a great name in a story” (Mackleprank), and some are named after famous historical figures (Abby = Abigail Adams, Derick = Frederick Douglass).

 

Shelly Brown
I have a degree in history, so my research nerd shows up when I start naming characters. I like my characters to have names that are both time period and location appropriate. Then the name just has to feel right. That process is harder to explain. Intuition. But we all know that a Jessica is not a Bianca.

 
Crystal Collier
Occasionally their names come with them. More often than not, I’m searching cultural and baby names listings. Usually I start from a symbolic angle. What part does this person play in the story? What is their key defining feature (personality wise)? What were the circumstances of their parents or family that would have influenced their name? For me, it’s a science of getting to know their culture and background.

 

Jessica Salyer
Sometimes I have a really hard time naming characters. I usually just feel what the character names should be. This last book I just stared I new what their names were right away, It was almost like they told me their names. For a short story I wrote I did make up my own name.

 

How do you find your character names?

The Big Reveal

Thursday, August 7th, 2014

Welcome to the Big Reveal
 

I enjoy reading author interviews, but often times they don’t ask the kinds
of questions I wonder about. So I’ve assembled a group of writers at
all levels, from un-agented to published, and every week I will
have a new question for them.
 

Where do you usually write?

 

 

Jessica Sayler
I usually write in my living room in my chair with earbuds and music playing. I can usually write anywhere as long as I have my music to just tune everything else out. As for the dream place to write a cafe in Paris would be awesome. Lol.

 
Madeline Mora-Summonte
I am a creature of habit. I write best in my home office, a cup of hot coffee or an iced coffee from Dunkin Donuts at my side. I prefer quiet but sometimes noisy neighbors or rambunctious tortoises get in the way. :)

 

Rebecca Barrow
I write all over the place—mostly in my kitchen during the day or at my desk at night. I used to write with music but now I find it better to work in silence. My ideal location would be next to a beautiful pool with plenty of comfy cushions and a steady stream of tropical drinks. That way I can reward every 100 words with a dip in the pool! Might not get much writing done, though…

 
Chad Morris
I write on the bus ride home from work, in my office at home, at the kitchen table, on the couch, at the park while my kids are playing (and then I get sucked in and play with them). …etc. I can’t listen to music when I write, or I’ll start singing along and lose focus. I love a bowl of cereal while I’m proofreading. And as far as dream settings go, I like Mark Twain’s octagon gazebo at Quarry farm (It’s at Elmira College now).

 

Shelly Brown
I am trying to train myself to write with music in the background but alas I still prefer silence.

I have an office desk and a rolling chair so I am hooked up for ultimate writing comfort. Really comfort and silence are all I need. Oh and a tall glass of ice water. Yeah, I dream big.

 
Crystal Collier
Give me a desk, a keyboard, mouse and window behind my setup with a scenic view. Beyond that, I don’t need anything. Truth, I can write anywhere and in any circumstances, but it takes a little priming in a new setting. Often I’ll write to music, but just as often I won’t. Guess it depends on my mood or if I like the soundtrack currently playing through my head.
 
Where do you usually write?

The Big Reveal

Friday, August 1st, 2014

Welcome to the Big Reveal
 

I enjoy reading author interviews, but often times they don’t ask the kinds
of questions I wonder about. So I’ve assembled a group of writers at
all levels, from un-agented to published, and every week I will
have a new question for them.
 

Do you have any trunked novels?

 

 

Shelly Brown
By trunked do you mean thrown in the trash? ;) I have the three novels that are on draft #TooManyToCount and still have a shot at making it out of the rubbish receptacle one day.

 
Crystal Collier
I don’t trunk novels. I do set them aside and reboot them later. Currently I have about 30 projects waiting in various stages of completion. Oh that I could freeze time and just write. =)

 

Jessica Sayler
I have two trucked or shelved novels. They both have about twenty thousand words so far and I do plan on finishing both of them when I have more time and when the characters speak to me again.

 
Madeline Mora-Summonte
Ha! I recently cleaned out my office closet and went through boxes of trunked novels, along with tons of rejection letters. I finally tossed the form letters but I did keep a chunk of the personalized ones. Some of those trunked novels will never see the light of the day, but I was pleasantly surprised to find a few that definitely have promise.

 

Rebecca Barrow
I have a few trunked novels that really never, ever need to see the light of day. One of those features characters that I’d like to write again, but if I ever do it will be a completely new draft of a completely different story.

 

Chad Morris
Yep! My first novel had a really fun premise, but I couldn’t quite make it work. I’d love to reinvent it sometime

 

Do you have any shelved novels? Permanent or temporary?
 

The Big Reveal

Thursday, July 24th, 2014

Welcome to the Big Reveal
 

I enjoy reading author interviews, but often times they don’t ask the kinds
of questions I wonder about. So I’ve assembled a group of writers at
all levels, from un-agented to published, and every week I will
have a new question for them.
 

Old fashioned book or E-reader?

 

 
Crystal Collier
I do both. I’ve read on the computer, kindle, and tablet. I prefer computer reading for editing, but for pleasure reading, it’s most comfortable to kick back with my kindle. Still, I LOVE the feel of paper. My reading is sometimes 50/50, and sometimes as high as 70/30 in favor of digital media.

 

Jessica Sayler
If you would have asked me this question a few years ago I would’ve been adamant that I would always love my paperback, but now that I’ve been using an e-reader I’ve found I love it. I have a Kindle and use it at home and I also have the Kindle app on my iPhone. I love the convenience of it. I always have a book with me and they sync to each other and keep my page. I love that I can read at night and not bother my husband cause it lights up just enough for me to read. I still do read some paperbacks, but for the most part I read everything on my phone or Kindle.

 
Madeline Mora-Summonte
I still prefer physical books but I do read ebooks occasionally, and I plan on reading more of them when I get my iPad mini. :)

 

Rebecca Barrow
Old fashioned book. I have read a couple of books on my iPad but I just can’t get into it. (I still buy actual albums instead of downloading, so maybe this is just a thing I have.)

 
Chad Morris
Both. In general, I prefer paper, but I love having books on my all on the time on my Kindle app. I also love audiobooks.

 

Shelly Brown
Paper books all the way but I read a lot on ereaders. They are more convenient for carrying in my purse so I have them on me all the time. I read on my phone on apps most of the time even though I own a kindle.

Do you prefer ‘real’ books or e-books?
 

The Big Reveal

Saturday, July 19th, 2014

Welcome to the Big Reveal
 

I enjoy reading author interviews, but often times they don’t ask the kinds
of questions I wonder about. So I’ve assembled a group of writers at
all levels, from un-agented to published, and every week I will
have a new question for them.
 

Do you prefer writing or editing?

 

Shelly Brown
Writing. I’m still trying to like editing.

 
Crystal Collier
Yes? Until about a year ago I really preferred editing, but this magic moment smacked me over the head and suddenly I understood the love of first drafts—probably because I adopted an in-depth outline and cut out much of the guess work. But editing? I could do that all day, every day.

 

Jessica Sayler
I prefer writing because I can let my imagination go crazy. I don’t have to worry so much about all the technical stuff, I can just have fun with my story.

 
Madeline Mora-Summonte
I don’t have a preference – I like them both for different reasons. Writing is wild and limitless, pure imagination and crazy creativity. Editing is taking all of that and taming it, pruning it, so it takes a shape that can be easily understood/read.

 

Rebecca Barrow
Editing. Drafting is really difficult for me—it takes me so much time and I have to force myself to spend the time doing it when I don’t want to. Editing is when I can finds ways to make the words say what I actually want them to, and seeing a story go from that first draft to a more polished product is always a great feeling.

 
Chad Morris
Writing. I love the creation of it. I don’t mind the initial rounds of editing because I can feel my work getting crisper, stronger, better. But after that, it gets harder and harder to go through my manuscripts.

Do you like writing or editing better?
 

The Big Reveal

Thursday, July 10th, 2014

Welcome to the Big Reveal
 

I enjoy reading author interviews, but often times they don’t ask the kinds
of questions I wonder about. So I’ve assembled a group of writers at
all levels, from un-agented to published, and every week I will
have a new question for them.
 

Do you prefer writing with real or imaginary settings?

 

 
Chad Morris
I like the imaginary stuff. Two of my recent reads had very intriguing settings: Coraline by Neil Gaiman, and I broke out of my genre and read Steelheart, by Brandon Sanderson. Of course, I pretty much love Cragbridge Hall. I usually only prefer real settings, when the story is true.

 

Shelly Brown
I’m a little bit obsessed with fictional settings in my writing. As a child I struggled with contemporary novels and that probably sways my feelings. Except for Nancy Drew. I could read those all day long. Nowadays I can read either just fine.
As far as a book with a fabulous setting there’s always Harry Potter. Setting was a HUGE character in those books. From bright fragrant candy shops to dank, snake-infested basements. From velvet-draped castle dorm rooms to the wind-whipped Quittich field. I could go on and on but it is clear that J.K. Rowling went through some trouble to make her locations memorable.

 
Crystal Collier
I love ANYTHING that takes me away. A time period, a foreign country, a new culture? I’m a sucker—as long as it doesn’t make me cry. I mostly read YA to stay up with my genre, branching occasionally into romance and thriller.

 

Jessica Sayler
I like to write both. With imaginary you can make up anything you want and anything goes, but with real you already know what’s there so that can be nice too. I also like to read both. Kelley Lynn’s Fraction series has beautiful imagery. It’s fantasy so the world she builds is fabulous and she does an amazing job of putting you right there with the characters.

 
Madeline Mora-Summonte
Most of my work takes place in “the real world” but I usually create the setting – making up the name of the town, etc. In my reading, I love when the setting is so strong it becomes a character in its own right, but I also enjoy when the setting is so recognizable that it fades into the background and I can focus on the story itself.

 

Rebecca Barrow
I would say that I do a mix of the two—I write contemporary, so my stories are set in the real world, but I often make up the actual towns or cities that I set them in. I find it easier that way, because no-one will be able to tell me that I got a specific detail of somewhere wrong. I mostly read contemp so I’m usually reading real settings, but a really good fantasy world will draw me in too. One of my absolute favourite worlds is Lyra’s Oxford in NORTHERN LIGHTS (and all the other worlds that appear in the rest of the series, too).

Do you prefer writing with real or imaginary settings?
 

The Big Reveal

Thursday, June 26th, 2014

Welcome to the Big Reveal

I enjoy reading author interviews, but often times they don’t ask the kinds
of questions I wonder about. So I’ve assembled a group of writers at
all levels, from un-agented to published, and every week I will
have a new question for them.

 

Is writing your real job?

 

Rebecca Barrow
Sadly, writing is not my real job. I work as a library assistant, so at least I’m still surrounded by books all day! I’ve been writing seriously for six years now. I wrote little stories when I was younger and the beginnings of about a thousand novels that I was sure were the best ideas in the entire UNIVERSE when I was 12 or 13. Thank God they are nowhere to be found now.

Chad Morris
I still have a full-time job writing curriculum for high schoolers. So, I write a lot. I didn’t write much as a kid. I was more of a doodler. But I didn’t like to read much either. I was a bit of a crazyhead.

 

Shelly Brown
I’m a mother of five. That’s my real job. The hours totally suck but I hear the payout is pretty awesome.

I had a few experiences early on in life from which I garnered that I was bad at fiction writing. It’s amazing how easy it is to crush a young spirit. I was a decent actress though and told stories that way for many years. I only picked up fiction writing again four years ago.

I didn’t write a lot as a kid BUT I did win honorable mention in elementary school for a Young Authors historical fiction piece about two friends who were separated during the Japanese Internment Camps. I bet the judges didn’t see that coming. ;)

Crystal Collier
YES! I even get paid. *gasp* I also home school my 3 wonderful children, serve as President over a church group of 75 children (teaching, coordinating weekly activities, managing other teachers and various lesson schedules/programs), and take the odd music composition/arrangement job or vocal performance gig.

 

Jessica Sayler
I’m a pediatric operating room nurse in my real life. I’ve been writing seriously for about three years. I did write a little as a kid, but never did anything seriously.

Madeline Mora-Summonte
I’ve been writing since I was a kid. It’s my passion, and I consider it a large part of who I am as a person.

 

Is writing your ‘real’ job?

The Big Reveal

Thursday, June 19th, 2014

Welcome to the Big Reveal
 

I enjoy reading author interviews, but often times they don’t ask the kinds
of questions I wonder about. So I’ve assembled a group of writers at
all levels, from un-agented to published, and every week I will
have a new question for them.
 

Did you choose your genre or did your genre choose you?

 

Madeline Mora-Summonte
I write whatever story wants to be told. Sometimes it’s more contemporary or women’s fiction and sometimes it’s darker stuff, like horror. I read across genres, and I believe that influences what and how I write – in a good way.

 

Rebecca Barrow
I’d definitely say my genre chose me—I’ve never written anything but contemporary (adult at first, and now YA) and I just went in that direction naturally. YA contemporary is my favourite genre to read, too. I would love to try writing other genres that aren’t too far from contemp but are still different—magical realism and horror

 
Chad Morris
I love middle grade fiction. It’s where my imagination lives. Plus, four out of my five kids are in my target audience and I love to read my crazy stories to them. As they grow older I might explore YA a bit more. I read a lot of middle grade, some YA, and I like a good biography every now and then.

 

Shelly Brown
I write MG because I love MG. My only disappointment is that I love a good romantic subplot and those aren’t so big in MG. SOoOooOo, I secretly write YA and NA to get the love stories out of my system in hopes of not making any 6th graders gag. I read a lot of Middle Grade and I’m a sucker for classic lit.

 
Crystal Collier
I’ve been seriously writing since I was 10 and have tried Fantasy, Romance, Paranormal, Historical, Sci-fi, Mystery, Biographical, Horror, Action, Urban Fantasy, Contemporary, Thriller, Inspirational, and Comedy in everything from picture books to adult. I’ve found I’m happiest writing for young adults (Because let’s face it, they rock!), and MUST include fantastic elements. My current projects fall into Historical Paranormal, Fantasy Action, Urban Fantasy, and Sci-fi with strong elements of romance.

 

Jessica Sayler
It definitely chose me. I loved to read adult romance, so that’s what I thought I’d end up writing, but then my first book I wrote ended up being YA and I was so surprised. Then all my ideas were YA. I do have a few NA and Adult, but those are on hold for now.

 

What genres do you write and read?
 

The Big Reveal

Saturday, June 14th, 2014

Welcome to the Big Reveal
 

I enjoy reading author interviews, but often times they don’t ask the kinds
of questions I wonder about. So I’ve assembled a group of writers at
all levels, from un-agented to published, and every week I will
have a new question for them.
 

What word(s) or phrases show up way too often in your work?

 

Jessica Sayler
That was a big one in the beginning, but now I catch it as I write it and think, “do I need this?” Feel was a big one too, but I try to stay diligent on that one too. I think the normal ones like just and I think I use smile too much.

 
Madeline Mora-Summonte
Early drafts of my novels see a lot of looks/looking and turns/turning. “Purple prose” is also a problem in the beginning but I’m usually – hopefully! – able to weed that out as I revise and edit.

 

Rebecca Barrow
Just, really, actually, I mean, it’s like, whatever—I don’t realize how bad it is until I’m doing this and see each of them five times on every single page. My characters are also always sighing, shrugging, and rolling their eyes…

 
Chad Morris
Ninja, jedi, one-eyed eskimo midget.

 

Shelly Brown
I have a list saved for reference. My key offender is just. It’s just so handy! ;)

 
Crystal Collier
Eyes. I’m all about the eyes—windows to the soul. I also tend to favor “light” or “darkness” and really big or obscure words. They don’t seem odd to me because I use them all the time. *shrugs* (Apparently vacillate and putrescence fit into that category.)

 

What words show up in your work a lot?