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  1. More on non-fiction versus fiction

    September 14, 2014 by Suzi

    Last week I had my friend Julie Sondra Decker here to talk about non-fiction versus fiction, in regards to writing/publishing. She has knowledge of both worlds because she just published her first non-fiction book, but she also is writing fiction. Today is part two, because she had a ton of great information. Go here to see part one.

     
    So my big question was, what is the difference between nf and fiction when it comes to querying and publishing?
     


    Querying Agents:

    Nonfiction: The book is pitched to agents based on a proposal, not a manuscript. Proposals are extensive documents that include the following, at minimum: a pitch statement; an overview; an outline of the intended audience, demand for the book, and competition; marketing and promotion information; an author profile; a proposed table of contents and brief synopsis of the main point of each section; and sample chapters. A query letter is still necessary at the agent stage, but you need to have a proposal ready.

    Fiction: The book is pitched to agents based on a query letter and sometimes sample chapters and/or synopsis. The agent doesn’t offer until they have read the actual book.
     
     
    Selling to Publishers:

    Nonfiction: Yes, it’s true; the book sells without being read by the acquiring editor, though they also generally want sample chapters to make sure you can write. I got a publishing contract and got paid a partial advance for my book before anyone read it (even my agent); they took it on the strength of the proposal and the sample chapters. (However, my book’s first draft was done before I queried agents; I felt I needed to be done before I could outline its contents effectively. The book had progressed in drafts by the time it sold, but I was still editing it up until the deadline for turning it in to the publisher!) Publishers sometimes offer to pay half the advance on acceptance and the other half the advance upon turning in the manuscript. That’s what I did.

    Fiction: Not only has the accepting editor read the book, but several other readers generally have too (especially if it’s a larger company). Fiction publishers sometimes offer contracts on books they haven’t read, but they’re generally offered with caveats; they will offer a multiple-book deal based on the strength of a completed first manuscript, or for the additional books in a series, or with the understanding that they can turn down your next book and make you write something else to satisfy the contract.

    It’s a world of difference between these two!

     
    No kidding. :) Which agent did you get first: non-fiction or novel? Was querying of one more stressful than the other?


    I was signed for fiction first. When my novel went on submission to publishers, I needed a distraction, so I wrote the nonfiction book. It got signed to an agent and sold to a publisher while I was waiting. Querying for fiction was much more stressful than querying for nonfiction, for two reasons:

    1. I feel fiction is more personal and more creative, so rejections cut deeper. Rejections of the nonfiction felt more like they just weren’t interested in the subject or thought my platform wasn’t developed enough.

    2. I knew the nonfiction would sell. It sounds a bit arrogant, I think, but I knew it was a book that needed to exist and that I was the right person to write it, and I had lots of other content on the subject that had already been well received. I thought it wouldn’t be long before an agent and then a publisher would see eye to eye with me and it would move. I was right. I wasn’t querying very long before I signed with Andrea, and I got three offers from publishers when it went on submission. I still wrestle with self-doubt on whether I’m good enough in fiction, so everything about it is more stressful.

     
    I read one of your novels. You’re definitely good enough. :) But I get what you mean about fiction being more personal than non-fiction.
     

    Does publishing a nonfiction book go faster than fiction? Or does it still take that year to year and a half like it seems it takes novels?

     


    It really does depend on your publisher. Smaller publishers can often get things out faster if they have the means, while larger publishers tend to plan several seasons in advance. My nonfiction publisher is a decent sized small independent. I signed the contract on November 20, 2013, and the book was scheduled for publication on September 2, 2014. I think that’s pretty typical for my size publisher. I don’t know that they would go any faster or slower for fiction; the biggest variable seems to be size of the company, not type of book. (Though obviously if an author gets an offer for a book they have not completed and then they don’t meet their deadline to turn in the actual written manuscript, delays could interfere.)

     
    I suppose it did help that you were all ready to go. I’d be curious to see stats on nf. If most people are like you, and have everything written, or if most go into with with only those sample pages.

     
    Thanks so much, Julie for all the information. Like I’d said before, I don’t really know any others who do non-fiction, so it was interesting to hear how the process go.
     
    And for those who haven’t seen it yet, here is more about her new book.
     

    What if you weren’t sexually attracted to anyone?

     
    A growing number of people are identifying as asexual. They aren’t sexually attracted to anyone, and they consider it a sexual orientation—like gay, straight, or bisexual.
     

    Asexuality is the invisible orientation. Most people believe that “everyone” wants sex, that “everyone” understands what it means to be attracted to other people, and that “everyone” wants to date and mate. But that’s where asexual people are left out—they don’t find other people sexually attractive, and if and when they say so, they are very rarely treated as though that’s okay.
     

    When an asexual person comes out, alarming reactions regularly follow; loved ones fear that an asexual person is sick, or psychologically warped, or suffering from abuse. Critics confront asexual people with accusations of following a fad, hiding homosexuality, or making excuses for romantic failures. And all of this contributes to a discouraging master narrative: there is no such thing as “asexual.” Being an asexual person is a lie or an illness, and it needs to be fixed.

     
    In The Invisible Orientation, Julie Sondra Decker outlines what asexuality is, counters misconceptions, provides resources, and puts asexual people’s experiences in context as they move through a very sexualized world. It includes information for asexual people to help understand their orientation and what it means for their relationships, as well as tips and facts for those who want to understand their asexual friends and loved ones.
     

    Author bio:

     
    Julie Sondra Decker is an author from Tampa, Florida. She writes fantasy and science fiction for adults and children, and is known as a prominent voice for the asexual community. Her nonfiction title The Invisible Orientation (Skyhorse/Carrel) releases September 2, 2014.

     
    Purchase Here | Read Reviews Here | Goodreads | Website | Blog | YouTube | Twitter


  2. Non-fiction versus Fiction

    September 7, 2014 by Suzi

    My friend Julie Sondra Decker just released her first book, The Invisible Orientation: An Introduction to Asexuality. This is a non-fiction book, but she is also a fiction writer, and she has two agents. I really wanted to get her on my blog to talk about the non-fiction versus fiction thing because I don’t really know too many nf writers. I’ve split it into two posts because she has a lot of great information, so make sure you come back next week for post two.
     

    Congratulations, Julie, and welcome again to my blog. So I’m curious. Did you write your nonfiction book before you started writing novels?
     

    No. I completed nine novels (and began four others that aren’t complete) before I thought of writing a nonfiction book. I primarily think of myself as a fiction author, but for some reason the short nonfiction pieces I’ve produced over the years have always gotten more attention than the fiction—probably just because I’m writing in a field that isn’t crowded yet.

     

    I’ve heard sometimes that with nf, writers send a query that is more like a proposal. They’ve only written a few chapters of the book and they look for an agent or publisher before finishing. Can you tell us some differences between the nf and fiction writing/publishing processes?

     
    Except for the fact that both are made up of words, nonfiction and fiction are Completely Different Animals. That’s everything from how it’s written to how it’s sold. Here are some huge differences I’ve seen while straddling the two:

     
    Completed Manuscript:

     
    Nonfiction: The book doesn’t have to be complete before pitching or selling. As long as you can describe its structure and content, it doesn’t actually have to be written.

     
    Fiction: The book has to be complete before even attempting to get an agent, unless it’s through a special arrangement.

     
    Author Platform:

     
    Nonfiction: It’s vital that the author has a demonstrable platform and is recognized as some kind of authority on their subject. They may have to demonstrate media appearances, previous publications, or recognized experience in the field.

     
    Fiction: They don’t even ask about platform, though if you’ve had any short story sales or relevant writing credits you can mention them in your query. Platform doesn’t get contracts for debut fiction authors unless they are celebrities or are self-published with lots of sales.

     

     
    Those are some pretty big differences. :) Do you have any other plans for writing nonfiction or will you just concentrate on fiction?
     

    I don’t plan to write another long nonfiction book, but I do write short nonfiction pretty often and will probably continue getting those published in magazines/blogs. However, a novel I have planned for the future incorporates the subject of my nonfiction book—the nonfiction book is about asexuality, and the upcoming fiction has an asexual character—so there will be some tie between my fiction and my nonfiction.

     
    Thanks for stopping by, Julie. We’ll see you next week too. She’ll be talking about querying and publishing for nf and fiction.
     

    And here is more about her new book.
     

    What if you weren’t sexually attracted to anyone?

     
    A growing number of people are identifying as asexual. They aren’t sexually attracted to anyone, and they consider it a sexual orientation—like gay, straight, or bisexual.
     

    Asexuality is the invisible orientation. Most people believe that “everyone” wants sex, that “everyone” understands what it means to be attracted to other people, and that “everyone” wants to date and mate. But that’s where asexual people are left out—they don’t find other people sexually attractive, and if and when they say so, they are very rarely treated as though that’s okay.
     

    When an asexual person comes out, alarming reactions regularly follow; loved ones fear that an asexual person is sick, or psychologically warped, or suffering from abuse. Critics confront asexual people with accusations of following a fad, hiding homosexuality, or making excuses for romantic failures. And all of this contributes to a discouraging master narrative: there is no such thing as “asexual.” Being an asexual person is a lie or an illness, and it needs to be fixed.

     
    In The Invisible Orientation, Julie Sondra Decker outlines what asexuality is, counters misconceptions, provides resources, and puts asexual people’s experiences in context as they move through a very sexualized world. It includes information for asexual people to help understand their orientation and what it means for their relationships, as well as tips and facts for those who want to understand their asexual friends and loved ones.
     

    Author bio:

     
    Julie Sondra Decker is an author from Tampa, Florida. She writes fantasy and science fiction for adults and children, and is known as a prominent voice for the asexual community. Her nonfiction title The Invisible Orientation (Skyhorse/Carrel) releases September 2, 2014.

     
    Purchase Here | Read Reviews Here | Goodreads

    Website | Blog | YouTube | Twitter


  3. Tell me your secrets

    August 22, 2014 by Suzi

    I’m helping my friend, Chloe Banks, celebrate the release of her debut novel, The Art of Letting Go. And she is even giving away a signed copy. All you have to do is tell us one little secret. So keep reading to find out about her new novel and how you can win a copy.


    The Art of Letting Go tells the story of Rosemary, whose peaceful seclusion is disrupted by the man she was involved in a traumatic relationship with decades earlier; only this time he’s lying in a coma and Rosemary must decide whether to let him live, or let him go. In the midst of her secret dilemma  she meets an abstract artist who is used to manipulating shapes and colours to make people see things differently. But what else is he manipulating? And can he help Rosemary see her own situation in a different light?

    The Art of Letting Go is available as a paperback and an e-book here in the UK and here in the US
     

    Sssshhhh…

     

    Probably my favourite quotation in all of literature is from The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett: “If you look the right way, you can see that the whole world is a garden.” It’s such a beautiful sentiment from a wonderful children’s novel. I blame my love of walled gardens – of secret beauty in all its forms – on this book.

     

    Many novels revolve around secrets. Secrets and misunderstandings are the mainstays of creating tension in literature. Whether it’s a wonderful (if tragic) secret such as a walled garden, or something more sinister – a dark past, hidden addictions – the real mystery can sometimes be why somebody is keeping something a secret, rather than the secret itself. And it’s that sort of mystery that my novel, The Art of Letting Go, is built around. Rosemary’s secret doesn’t seem that sinister – a past relationship that didn’t work out – but why is she keeping it a secret at all? If you’re curious, I’ll let you find out for yourselves!

    As this is the last stop on my blog tour, I thought you might indulge me in some fun. Let’s share our secrets! Or at least, let’s share our embarrassing pasts or funny misunderstandings. Nothing heavy needed – in fact, it’d probably be simpler for Suzi if you didn’t confess to murder on her blog – tell me something fun or funny. At the end of the month I’ll pop the names of everybody who has left a comment on this post into a hat and draw one person out to receive a signed copy of my novel. If you really can’t think of a secret/misunderstanding to tell us about, and you’d still like a chance to win, how about telling us your favourite line from literature instead?

     

    Here are a few quotations about secrets to get you in the mood:

    “If you want to keep a secret, you must also hide it from yourself.” George Orwell, 1984

    “Secrets have a way of making themselves felt, even before you know there’s a secret.” Jean Ferris, Once Upon a Marigold

    And one from The Art of Letting Go for you, “He wasn’t flesh and blood, only colour and shape – a painting that had come to life.  I knew I could tell him everything that had ever happened to me – everything I’d forgotten – and it would be like whispering to the wind. Secrets would never escape him because he wasn’t real; he was an imitation of reality, a child’s sketch of a man.”

    So, come on, spill the beans! I’ll start if you like…

    When I was a child I spent every day out in our garden in my own little world. Not only that, but I couldn’t go in for the night until I had been all round our (large) garden and said the same words to the same landmarks – the apple tree, the place where I’d buried a dead pigeon, the bush where the robin would sing – every single night. I had to say goodnight to certain bits of the garden or I was worried they’d feel lonely. I had plenty of school friends but my best friend, to whom I told all my secrets, was our old apple tree. And I’ve never told anybody that before! (I also had a similar ritual with parts of my bedroom before I could sleep at night, but I think that’s enough confessions for one day.)

    Over to you.

    Thanks, Chloe. Congratulations again on your release. Now let’s see if anyone has anything interesting to share!


    And here is a little more about Chloe.

    Chloe Banks lives in a peaceful corner of the UK with her husband, son and a sense of childish wonder. She started writing for a dare and forgot to stop until it was too late. She is a prize-winning short story writer and a first-time novelist, represented by The Andrew Lownie Literary Agency.
     
     
     


  4. The Real Thing

    August 19, 2014 by Suzi

    My friend Cassie Mae has just released another one of her fantastic books. So make sure you check it out. And here’s Cassie Mae to tell us more about The Real Thing and the special swag she’s giving away.

     
     

    Time to party!
    The Real Thing releases today (whoop whoop!) and I’m giving away a swag pack full of goodies.

    The Real Thing postcards

    A froggy loofah

    Oh the Places You’ll Go! by Dr. Seuss

    Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss

    The Real Thing Samsung Galaxy S3 Phone Case

    A Cassie Mae pen

    A collection of select Cassie Mae/Becca Ann signed books

    Rafflecopter right below the excerpt and book details :)

    *********************************************************************************

    “All right, all right,” he says, smiling and holding his palm up to stop me. Tomato juice is dripping from the top of his head down his cheeks, getting caught in the smile lines by his mouth. I can feel it running down my face, too, and I should be gagging, but I’m not.

    I open my mouth to tell him how cute he looks even with juice all over him, but a light ploof! hits the center of the tub between our bodies, and I stare down at my froggy loofah, now covered in red.

    “Oh no!” I frown, plucking the sponge up by the froggy’s arm, then looking up to the shower caddy over Eric’s head. Our splash war must’ve knocked my poor froggy right off his little perch. “My loofah.”

    “That’s what it’s called!” Eric slaps the top of his knee, getting more juice on both of us. “I’ve been staring at that thing since you moved in, trying to remember what the hell people call it.”

    A small bubble of laughter escapes through my slight frown. “Why?”

    “That thing is creepy.”

    I gasp. “It is not. It’s cute.” My lip pokes out as I look at the juice soaking into the blue frog’s face. “And now it’s ruined.”

    He takes the loofah from my fingers, an adorable pinched look on his face.

    “I don’t know how you can wash yourself with this,” he says, pulling at the leg poking from the big green sponge part.

    “It’s soft on my sensitive lady parts.” I laugh as his face goes red again. I expect him to drop the loofah back in my hand—or throw it at me—but he doesn’t. He keeps pulling at it as if it’s the weirdest, yet most fascinating thing in the world.

    “Is it really ruined?” he asks, tone suddenly nowhere near his usual playfulness. He actually looks worried about my sponge.

    “It’s like a buck, Eric.” I adjust in the tub again as the juice creeps into nooks and crannies of my body I had no idea existed till now. “I can get another one tomorrow. Maybe an even creepier one just for you.”

    I try to wink, but I’ve never been good at that. He sort of laughs, but his eyes go back to the froggy. He runs his thumb over the eyeballs, wiping the juice from it. I thought I knew Eric pretty well. But as I watch him stare at my loofah, head slightly cocked to the side, I realize I have no clue what he’s thinking. And that’s totally okay. The anticipation of finding out is better.

    “Only a dollar?” His eyes lift to mine.

    “Or two. Depending on where you go.”

    His lips purse and he nods, then plunges the sponge into the juice. Before I can smack him for that, he pulls it from the bath and wrings it out over my head. My jaw drops to my knees.

    “Oh, you are so dead.”

    *********************************************************************************
    Buy Me!

    In this electrifying novel from Cassie Mae, two close friends surprise themselves by shifting from platonic love to sexual attraction.

    Eric Matua has one friend—his best friend and childhood sweetheart, who needs a place to stay for the summer. Mia Johnson has thousands of friends—who live in her computer. Along with her email chats and Facebook notifications, Mia also devours romance novels, spending countless hours with fictional characters, dreaming of her own Romeo to sweep her off her feet. When she starts receiving supersweet messages from a stranger who thinks she’s someone else, Mia begins to believe that real love is possible outside her virtual world.

    When the two friends become roommates, Mia finds herself falling harder than she ever thought she could. But Eric keeps his desires locked away, unsure of himself and his ability to give his best friend what she deserves in a boyfriend. As her advances are continually spurned, Mia splits her time between Eric and her computer. But she soon realizes she’s about to lose the only real thing she’s ever had.

    Advance praise for The Real Thing

    “Cassie Mae is awesome! The perfect balance between laugh-out-loud funny and achingly poignant, The Real Thing is the ultimate escapist read. I didn’t want it to end!”—Lauren Layne, author of Isn’t She Lovely

    “Watching two best friends figure out how to fall in love makes The Real Thing a summer read of swoon-worthy perfection.”—Jolene Perry, author of The Summer I Found You

    “Cassie Mae’s The Real Thing made me want to close out every social media app and electronic device I have, but I couldn’t manage to stop reading!”—Rebecca Yarros, author of Full Measures

    About the Author

    Cassie Mae (who dawns the name Becca Ann on occasion) is the author of a few hundred… okay, maybe not that many… books. Some of which became popular for their quirky titles, characters, and stories. She likes writing about nerds, geeks, the awkward, the fluffy, the short, the shy, the loud, the fun.

    Since publishing her bestselling debut, Reasons I Fell for the Funny Fat Friend, she has published and sold books to Random House, Swoon Romance, and Spencer Hill Press. She has a favorite of all her book babies, but no, she won’t tell you what it is. (Mainly because it changes depending on the day.)

    Along with writing, Cassie likes to binge watch Teen Wolf and The Big Bang Theory. She can quote Harry Potter lines quick as a whip. And she likes kissing her hubby, but only if his facial hair is trimmed. She also likes cheesecake to a very obsessive degree.

    You can stalk, talk, or send pictures of Dylan O’Brien to her on her Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/cassiemaeauthor

    ****************Giveaway!******************

     


  5. Flesh Eating Zombies

    August 15, 2014 by Suzi

    I’ve always like horror movies and books and one day I hope to write some of my own. I just haven’t developed any of my ideas yet. Too many other things to do.


    Today, I’ve got my friend’s, Rachel Schieffelbein, cover reveal for her upcoming zombie book. Not only does it have a creeptastic cover and an awesome title, but it has a totally unexpected ending. I loved it. So make sure you check it out.


    So make sure you check it out. Now… from Rachel.

    It’s cover reveal day for FLESH EATING ZOMBIES AND EVIL EX-GIRLFRIENDS!
    I’m so excited to share it with all of you! It’s creepy and dark and just right for the book.
    So without further ado, here it is!

    Erwin is in hell— Locked in his high school with his ex-girlfriend, her new pain-in-the-ass boyfriend, and a handful of others while zombies claw at the doors trying to fight their way in.

    The bright light in the dark is Sylvia, whose strength helps hold Erwin together when everything is falling apart.

    When they realize the school is no longer safe, Erwin is determined to keep the group together and get them all to safety.
    But he can’t save everyone.


    Release day is September 17th. Don’t forget to add it to your Goodreads list!

     


  6. The downside of collaborations

    July 27, 2014 by Suzi

    The downside of collaborations… from a reader’s perspective.
     
    When two writers get together and write an amazing story, they forget about one thing.
     
    How difficult it is for us readers to get an autographed book. I mean, it’s hard enough getting an author’s signature, but two? It’s not like they usually live in the same city. Or even state.
     
    So a few years back I got a signed copy of My Heart for Yours (MYFY) from Steph Campbell. Her co-author was Jolene Perry. And my book felt so lonely sitting on the shelf with only one autograph. And then one day, the book got packed up into a suitcase, boarded an airplane, and landed in Salt Lake City. All to accompany me to the Storymakers Conference.
     
    MHFY was overjoyed when I, the lowly owner, presented the book to Jolene Perry and asked her if she could sign it. And she did, cause she’s cool like that. I mean, I didn’t even have to beg or anything. :)
     
    And now my book is happy.
     
    But then… while there, the generous Cassie Mae gave me a copy of her collabs with Theresa Paulo, King Sized Beds & Happy Trails and Beach Side Beds & Sandy Paths. And of course she signed them too.
     
    Now those two books are unhappy because they do not have Theresa’s autograph. And now I’m going to have to hunt down her down to get her to sign it because I don’t want those books to be unhappy.
     
    Unfortunately Theresa lives half a country away, but fortunately, she offered that if I ever came to New York, I could stay with her for a week or two. And she’s feed me and clothe me and show me all the sites of NYC. Right, Theresa?
     
    Um, Theresa?
     
    :)
     
    So I’m hoping I don’t have to wait too long before I can get her to sign it. But by then, they’ll have the third story out, Lonesome Beds & Bumpy Roads, and I’ll just bring that one along too. But then it won’t have Cassie Mae’s autograph and then I’ll have to go to Utah again. And they’ll probably write more books together.
     
    And this will never end. See, you collaborating authors, what problems you cause for us readers?
     
    I guess I should stop complaining because I actually have those autographs, huh?
     
    Do you have books that are collaborations, and you got it signed by one or both of the authors?


  7. Sidelined

    July 13, 2014 by Suzi

    I’ve got Kyra Lennon here today to talk about series writing. She is releasing the third book in her Game On Series and you must check them out.
     
    Welcome, Kyra and congratulations on your newest release. So I was wondering. Did you start writing the first, Game On, knowing it’d be a series?

     
    Nope, it was supposed to be one book, one story, but it got a little out of hand! One of my CPs suggested making it into a series shortly after the book was released, and early reviews told me that people were interested in the secondary characters as well as the main characters so I went with it – and here we are at Book 3!
     
    Are there any more planned?
     
    It will be a five book series. After that, no more lol!
     
    You have your novella, but have you written any other stand alone stories/novels?
     
    I have one standalone written, about a rock band, although there is potential for a companion novel. I also have two standalones half written, but I’m not really sure how they’re going to work out just yet. I will definitely be easing off on writing anymore book series for a while once Game On is finished!
     
    How did you pick which characters to do the stories about?
     
    Originally, the plan was for a four book series, focusing on Leah Walker (the MC from Game On) and her two best friends, Bree and Freya, with the final book going back to Leah. But Jesse Shaw was such a popular character in Game On, I decided it was worth giving him his own book. I have also had some suggestions that there should be a book dedicated to the Westberg Warriors beefcake, Bryce Warren, but I think adding any more books to the mix at this point would be a mistake.
     
    Bryce gets a lot of page time in the last two books, so I think people will be satisfied.

     
    Since your series has different main characters, how to do you keep track of all their personality traits and such. Are you organized with it all in a notebook(s)? Or on the computer?

     
    Haha, I am not organised at all! I think I do have anotebook around somewhere that has very, very basic notes in, but for the most part, the information lives inside my head, and just stays there until I’m ready to let it out!

     
    Thanks so much for interviewing me, Suzi! This was fun!

     
    Thanks for sharing with us, Kyra.
     

    At the age of twenty-one, Bree Collinson has more than she ever dreamed of. A handsome husband, a fancy house, and more shoes than Carrie Bradshaw and Imelda Marcos combined. But having everything handed to her isn’t the way Bree wants to live the rest of her life.

    When an idea to better herself pops into her head, she doesn’t expect her husband to question her, and keep her tied by her apron strings to the kitchen.

    Isolated and unsure who to turn to, Bree finds herself falling back into a dangerous friendship, and developing feelings for the only person who really listens to her. Torn between her loyalty to her husband and her attraction to a man who has the perfect family she always wanted, she has some tough choices to make.

    While Bree tries to figure out what she wants, a tragedy rocks the Westberg Warriors, triggering some dark memories, and pushing her to take a look at what’s really important.

    About the Author:

    Kyra is a self-confessed book-a-holic, and has been since she first learned to read. When she’s not reading, you’ll usually find her hanging out in coffee shops with her trusty laptop and/or her friends, or girling it up at the nearest shopping mall.

    Kyra grew up on the South Coast of England and refuses to move away from the seaside which provides massive inspiration for her novels.
    Her debut novel, Game On (New Adult Contemporary Romance), was released in July 2012, and she scored her first Amazon Top 20 listing with her New Adult novella, If I Let You Go.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Category Books | Tags: , | 9 Comments


  • It’s all new to me

    June 2, 2014 by Suzi

    Research is often a big part of writing a novel. And since a lot of us writers are introverts and don’t feel like calling up strangers to ask about interviewing them, we turn to the internet. Blogs, websites, video sites…
     
    Today I’ve got Theresa Paolo, who is releasing her second novel, to talk about the research she did. If you haven’t read the first story, you should read that. (Never) Again and (Once) Again are companion novels, so they don’t need to be read in order, but it’s much better that way. :)

     
    So the main character Josh (who by the way is hot :) and totally funny), is dealing with an injury from a terrible ordeal suffered in (Never) Again. What was the main subject you had to research for his story?
     

    I did a lot of research on gun shot wounds. Even watched several Youtube videos on the healing process and cleaning them. Youtube seriously has a video for everything! I am very squeamish when it comes to blood so this was definitely hard for me. But I wanted to be as accurate as possible. I also just did Google searches and found blog posts and medical sites where people with gun shot wounds discussed the long healing process and the pain associated with it.

     

    I’ve seen websites where you can submit your medical question to a doctor. That is super cool because sometimes you can’t find those little details that are important to your story by just Googling.
     
    What’s something new/interesting you learned about gunshot wounds?
     
    That a gunshot wound takes a great deal of time to heal. If it’s in the leg as Josh’s wound is in (Once) Again there’s potential for a limp, for nerve damage and the biggest concern is infection which is why it needs to be kept clean.

     

    I’ve never had a gunshot wound, luckily :) , but Theresa did a good job making me feel what Josh was going through physically and emotionally in her story.
     

    What is the most unusual research you did, if there was one weirder than this?
     

    Gun shot wounds just might take the cake!

     

    Some of the ‘interesting’ searches I’ve done for my writing include suicide, hanging specifically, and also about what it’s like to work as a stripper. (Not to convinced it’s worth the money. :) )
     
    Thanks for stopping by, Theresa. And now I want to know if you’ve ever done any unusual research for your novels?
     
    And if you haven’t heard about Theresa’s latest novel, here is the blurb.
     
    Josh will have to reconcile his past…
     

    In order to make Kat his future.
     

    After surviving a real-life nightmare, Josh Wagner is sent home from his dream college on crutches. Bedridden and tormented by flashbacks, he’s just seen his world shattered and his baseball scholarship go up in smoke. Josh’s family hires a health aide to help take care of him, but when he opens the door, the last person he expects to see is his biggest regret…
     

    Katherine Singleton is the only girl Josh has ever loved. Now, even though she’s only taking care of him because it’s her job, Josh is determined to win her back. But Kat had to move on after their breakup two years ago, and despite her feelings for Josh, a lot has happened since he left…

     
    When Kat’s past comes back to haunt her, Josh decides it’s his turn to take care of her. But protecting her—and redeeming himself—will put Josh in the line of fire again. Will he survive this time?
     
    And here is where to find out all about Theresa.

     
    Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads | Pinterest
     
    Amazon | Barnes and Noble







     
    And, of course, a chance to win…
    a Rafflecopter giveaway

    Category Writing | Tags: ,, | 8 Comments


  • Sisters (and brothers)

    March 23, 2014 by Suzi

    My friends, Kelley Lynn and Jenny Morris, just released their book, Road to Somewhere. It’s about two sisters, a roadtrip, and apparently cowboys. :) I haven’t had a chance to read it since I just purchased it last night, but I really like the storyline being about two sisters.

    I haven’t seen a lot of that in YA. More often when books involve siblings, it’s a brother/sister combination. Or, you typically have a ‘good’ sibling and a ‘bad’ sibling, but this doesn’t seem to be that way either.
     
    So I’m looking forward to reading this story about Charlie and Lucy. And I’m also curious about those cowboys. :)
     
    Let me know what other books you’re read about sisters OR brothers. Or if you’ve read Road to Somewhere.


    Road to Somewhere at Amazon or Goodreads

     
    For Charlie, a post-high school road trip isn’t just a vacation, it’s life changing. While her parents think she’s helping a friend move, a chance at fame is the real reason to grab her best friends and drive to L.A. But when her super annoying, uber-responsible, younger sister, Lucy, has to tag along, it isn’t quite the summer of fun she imagined.

    Add in a detour to her grandparents’ ranch in Texas, and between mucking the stalls, down-home cookin’, and drool worthy ranch hands, this could just turn into the best, and most complicated, summer of their lives.

    Category Books | Tags: , | 2 Comments


  • The Real Thing

    March 21, 2014 by Suzi

    Today I’ve got the cover reveal for Cassie Mae’s latest novel, The Real Thing.
    Since she’s way more funny than I am, I’m gonna let her introduce it.

    Take it away Cassie Mae…

     

    So, this book… it’s about this girl.
    And she loves her online time.
    Her phone is her buddy.
    And her favorite app is her Kindle, because she also LOVES to read.
    Read a lot.
    Then there’s this boy.
    He’s best friends with this bookworm girl.
    He sort of has a thing for her.
    But, he’s also got major anxiety.
    And isn’t sure how to make a move.
    So when they end up rooming together for the summer, this guy tries to get this girl to put the screen away long enough for him to win her over.
    But of course, it’s not easy to unplug. Especially for an internet junkie.
    Hmm… that girl sounds pretty familiar ;)
    And here’s the hawt cover for it! 

    And here’s the actual blurb, and not my picture version :)

    Eric Matua has one friend—his best friend and childhood sweetheart, who needs a place to stay for the summer. Mia Johnson has thousands of friends—who live in her computer. Along with her email chats and Facebook notifications, Mia also devours romance novels, spending countless hours with fictional characters, dreaming of her own Romeo to sweep her off her feet. When she starts receiving supersweet messages from a stranger who thinks she’s someone else, Mia begins to believe that real love is possible outside her virtual world.
    When the two friends become roommates, Mia finds herself falling harder than she ever thought she could. But Eric keeps his desires locked away, unsure of himself and his ability to give his best friend what she deserves in a boyfriend. As her advances are continually spurned, Mia splits her time between Eric and her computer. But she soon realizes she’s about to lose the only real thing she’s ever had.

    About Cassie Mae :)
    Cassie Mae is a nerd to the core from Utah, who likes to write about other nerds who find love. She’s the author of the Amazon Bestsellers REASONS I FELL FOR THE FUNNY FAT FRIEND and HOW TO DATE A NERD, and is the debut author for the Random House FLIRT line with her New Adult novels FRIDAY NIGHT ALIBI and SWITCHED. She spends time with her angel children and perfect husband who fan her and feed her grapes while she clacks away on the keyboard. Then she wakes up from that dream world and manages to get a few words on the computer while the house explodes around her. When she’s not writing, she’s spending time with the youth in her community as a volleyball and basketball coach, or searching the house desperately for chocolate.

    Category Books | Tags: , | No Comments


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